Uncategorized, Writing for Children

Novel Revision: First Steps

A few weeks ago I announced I was beginning a long-overdue middle-grade novel revision. Every journey begins with a first step, so I’m checking in today to talk about my first steps and why they are important to my overall process.

First, I read the beginning chapters of Novel Metamorphosis by Darcy Pattison. In her novel revision guide, Darcy recommends reading two other books before starting the exercises in her workbook. These two books are:

  • SELF-EDITING FOR FICTION WRITERS, by Renni Browne and Dave King, Harper Collins, 2004.
  • THE FIRST FIVE PAGES, by Noah Lukeman, Fireside Books, 2000.

I’ve started the first book and am re-learning and being reminded of many things. It’s always good to refresh your editing skills, especially if you are timid with the delete button and tend to hang on to words that need to be let go. Thankfully, I’ve become pretty ruthless when it comes to self-editing over the years. That means I’m rarely married to any sentence, paragraph or section; my chopping block is no respecter of words. So rather than digest the entire book before diving in, I decided to read the rest of it as I go and use it primarily as a reference tool. I have not yet started reading the second book.

The main reason for putting off reading the second book was because one of my long-time critique partners and friends asked if anyone in our critique group would be interested in swapping middle-grade manuscripts. We are a picture book group, but a few of us also dabble in middle grade, so I decided it was perfect timing for me and said, “Yes!”

I was so nervous. It’s been years since anyone that I’m close to has read my novel. Years! I had an agent interested last year, which is part of the motivation for this revision. So showing it to someone I trust as both a writer and a friend, was a huge step for me. We swapped, and within a few days she sent me her critique, and her comments have boosted my confidence in a huge way as well as helped me see the areas that need the most work. Whew! I could finally exhale, knowing I wasn’t wasting my time and that the story still had merit and was worth working on. I didn’t realize it at the time I sent it to her, but this was probably the best way I could have started this revision.

The second thing I did was take time to actually read my book again. I didn’t read all of it, because that’s what I’m doing as I go through and make changes, but I read enough. I needed reminding that what I started 10 years ago during that dark time wasn’t just therapy or a way to deal with emotions. I needed to see it with the fresh eyes of today’s me rather than the me of that time in my life. And you know what I discovered? I really like it. I’m excited to spend time with the characters and help them grow stronger and change where change is needed.

Without pausing for these few weeks of reading and reflection, I would have come to this project as just another task in my writing life. I would have opened my workbook with a sigh rather than a spark, and that would not have worked over the long haul. Revision takes time, and if you’re not motivated by a love of the work, it will quickly turn into drudgery and you’ll never finish.

So here’s to finding the path into the process that works for you. I’m glad I was able to see my way clear to doing these things before I ever added or deleted one word from my WIP. I hope today’s thoughts encourage you to find the just-right way to begin your next big project!


Sensibility- Take time to fall in love with your WIP again. You must be willing to spend time with the characters you’ve created, no matter where they are on their journey.

Sense- Not every path to revision looks the same for every writer. If you find yourself stuck in someone else’s process, stop, think, breathe and reflect on what you need to do to move forward.


“If we are not willing to fail we will never accomplish anything. All creative acts involve the risk of failure.” -Madeleine L’Engle

 

 

Writing for Children

Happy Publishing News!

I’m so excited to announce that I have signed a contract with Blue Whale Press an imprint of Clear Fork Publishing for my picture book, O POSSUM’S PREDICAMENT! I want to thank Alayne Kay Christian and Callie Metler-Smith for believing in this possum’s tail and for believing in me, and to my amazing critique partners for all of your help!

During these challenging times, good news seems extra good! It makes my heart happy to know that stories are still going out to brighten and inform the lives of children no matter where they are learning, whether virtually or in person.

I can’t wait to see O POSSUM out in the world. Bless you all for your continued support! Happy dancing!

 

 


Sensibility- Often the most creative moments come during the most challenging times.

Sense- During this time of quarantine, where days seem to melt into each other, it’s still important to carve out time for creativity. Whether it’s writing in a journal, knitting, baking bread, or writing for children, stretching your mind with new projects is good for your emotional well-being.


 

 

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Happy New Year from Sensibility and Sense!

Image courtesy of Pixabay/jeffjacobs1990

Dear Friend,

I want to wish you and your family and friends a blessed and Happy New Year! I’m so grateful you’re part of my journey and appreciate so much when you stop by and read my musings about writing or celebrate with me when I have good news. You truly are one of my best gifts. . .

And guess what?! In just a few weeks I’m going to have some big news to share, and I cannot wait! So please keep visiting and reading so you can be part of the celebration!

Happy New Year!

Patti Richards


Sensibility- The writer journey, full of its twists and turn, highs and lows, is one I’m grateful to be on! 

Sense- When it comes time for New Year’s resolutions and goal setting, be kind to yourself. Set measurable, reachable benchmarks so you can look back on 2020 and be happy with what you’ve accomplished. Remember, life is a one-day-at-a-time journey. Look for the joy! 


 

Coming in 2020. . .

A brand-spanking-new Sensibility and Sense!

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“THANKU” Makes the Chicago Public Library’s list for “Best Informational Books for Young Readers of 2019”

I’m so excited to share that “ThankU, Poems of Gratitude,” has made the Chicago Public Library’s list for “Best Informational Books for Younger Readers of 2019.”

Congratulations to editor, Miranda Paul, illustrator, Marlena Myles and all the amazing poets that make up this anthology: Joseph Bruchac, Naomi Shihab Nye, Kimberly M. BlaeserSun Yung Shin, Ed DeCaria, Becky Bookout ShillingtonPadma VenkatramanGwendolyn HooksJane Yolen, Janice Scully, Charles WatersCarole LindstromSylvia LiuCarolyn Dee FloresSarvinder Bal NaberhausLupe Ruiz-FloresBaptiste PaulCynthia Leitich Smith, Chrystal D. Giles, Margarita Engle, Kenn Nesbitt, JaNay Brown-WoodDiana MurrayMegan Elizabeth Hoyt, Jamie McGillen, Renee LaTulippeVanessa NewtonTraci McClellan-SorellCharles Ghigna, and Liz Garton Scanlon. I am beyond humbled to be part of this project!

 

Here’s wishing everyone a Happy and Healthy Thanksgiving:)

Thank you all for being part of the journey!

Patti Richards

 

Uncategorized, Writing for Children

Play On, Children! Play On!

Music runs deep in my family’s veins. I’m not sure how it all got started, but I know my great-grandparents on my mother’s side loved music and fiddle playing and clogging. It didn’t take much of a tune to have my grandmother and her sisters up and dancing that’s for sure. I learned how to clog in Granny Grace’s kitchen (my great aunt), and every now and then, when my Mama Glad was working in the kitchen she’d start to “cut a rug” and we’d all join in. She had a music room in every house she ever lived in, fully decked out with a piano, organ, banjo, several guitars (including a beautiful Gibson), a drum kit (sometimes), harmonica and even an accordion. When my sister and I were old enough, she’d play the organ while one of us played the piano, and we’d sing and laugh and sing some more. What a gift!

So when I saw my youngest on stage for her autumn college orchestra concert this weekend step to the microphone, welcome guests, lead in prayer and take her seat in the cello section, I thought about how all this love for music has trickled down to children, grandchildren and now great-grandchildren over many years. I thought, what if my great grandmother, who died when Mama Glad was only 11, hadn’t passed the gift on to her daughters? What if Mama Glad hadn’t sat down at the piano for the first time or picked up a guitar or banjo, what would our lives be like now? My mom and dad both have beautiful voices, my sister sings, plays and the piano and organ and teaches elementary music, I play the piano, a little organ, and my husband and I sing. My son, Wes, played the piano and trumpet and now pours his love of music into sound engineering, and his wife, Katie, loves music and sings! Both of my daughters play the piano, and Julia is also a violinist and Olivia a cellist. Julia graduated with a degree in Music Education last year and is now teaching, and Olivia will graduate in another year with a double major in music and marketing. Her dream is to start a nonprofit where low-income children can come and take lessons and record their musical creations for free in a recording studio so they can share their gifts with the world. I pour my love of music into every story I write for children; in the way the words appear on the page and how they feel in the mouth and sound to the ear. Music is everywhere in our lives.

Children need heritage. It connects them with the past, guides them in the present and offers hope for the future. As they grow, heritage can help children feel part of something so much bigger than themselves. Music for Mama Glad and her sisters looked very different from how it has been woven into my life and the lives of my children. But it’s all the same thread holding us together creating the patchwork quilt that is our story.

During this month of Thanksgiving, I hope you can look at your own family’s history and find the chords, notes or threads that create your unique song. Celebrate those with the ones you love and pass on the gifts to your children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. I promise you, they’ll be grateful.


Sensibility- There’s more to your stories than what you see on the page. Your history and personal journey find their way into everything you write.

Sense- Make a list of things your family loves to do. If you don’t know where the traditions began, try and find out how those things became part of your lives and share them with your family during this season of gratitude!


What are some of your family traditions? How did they get started?

Writing for Children

A Season of Gratitude!

 

I’m so thrilled to be part of THANKU: POEMS OF GRATITUDE, Edited by Miranda Paul and Illustrated by Marlena Myles (Millbrook, September 2019). It’s my debut as a children’s poet, and I couldn’t be prouder of the finished product. Part of the proceeds from the sale of this book help fund WeNeedDiverseBooks.org, an organization dedicated to diversity in children’s literature. All children need to see themselves in children’s books, both as characters and in the people who create them, and We Need Diverse Books is committed to making this happen!

I would especially like to thank Miranda Paul for making this work possible and for allowing me the chance to be part of it. Thanks, Miranda!

As we approach the season of Thanksgiving, I hope this book helps you and all the young readers in your home learn more about what being grateful means. Many blessings to you and yours in the coming weeks!

 


Sensibility- Gratitude is more than just saying, “Thank you!” It is an attitude of the heart!

Sense- Set aside time in the weeks ahead for thankfulness. A gratitude jar, a conversation at the dinner table or during quiet moments before sleeping or bedtime prayers help children grow their gratefulness each day.


 

What are some ways you and your family focus on gratitude during the holidays?

 

 

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Oh, Guilty Heart! – Susanna Hill’s 4th Annual Valentiny Writing Contest!

It’s almost Valentine’s Day and that means it’s time for Susanna Hill’s Annual Valentiny Writing Contest! I love holidays and writing contests, so this one was a perfect fit for me. Here are the rules:

“. . .write a Valentines story appropriate for children (children here defined as ages 12 and under) maximum 214 words in which someone feels guilty!  Your someone can feel guilty themselves or make someone else feel guilty.  They may feel guilty for good reason, or just because they think they should!  Your story can be poetry or prose, sweet, funny, surprising or anything in between, but it will only count for the contest if it includes someone guilty (can be the main character but doesn’t have to be) and is 214 words (get it? 2/14 for Valentines Day).” 

Hope you enjoy what I came up with. . .

 

Woa, Diddle, Diddle! 

By Patti Richards

 

On Valentine’s Day

I wanted to play

A tune for my very best girl.

 

So, I ran down the hill,

To give her a thrill

And said, “Cat, can I give it a whirl?”

 

“You want THIS violin?”

The cat said with a grin,

“I know you can’t handle the magic.”

 

But Jill loved a good tune.

And if I couldn’t croon

The results would be terribly tragic.

 

So, when I stole that fiddle

To play “Diddle, Diddle,”

The guilt was quite strong, I’ll confess.

 

‘Cause when I began playing

That cow started swaying

And jumping and making a mess.

 

She bounced off the moon,

Then clomped on the spoon,

Tripping over the dish on the way.

 

As she toppled the dog

Her hoof stuck on a log,

Where Miss Muffet was eating her whey.

 

Now hear these wise words

(While I’m raking up curds),

Be careful when playing a tune.

 

If a cow is around

Her love for the sound

Could mean more than just jumping the moon!

 

A dance may ensue

And cause you to rue

The time you and a fiddle cut loose.

 

‘Cause you’ll spend the day hearing

The thing you’ve been fearing,

A lecture from your Mother Goose!

 


Sensibility- It’s fun to take familiar stories, nursery rhymes and fables upside down and make them your own.

Sense-When writing fractured folktales, fairy tales, nursery rhymes and fables that have strong main characters for an immediate reader connection.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Writing for Children

STORYSTORM 2018!

I just signed up for STORYSTORM 2018, and I’m looking forward to 30 brand-spanking-new story ideas by the end of January! Thanks for hosting again this year, Tara Lazar, and happy 10th Storystorm Anniversary!

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Susanna Hill’s 8th Annual Holiday Writing Contest! MAZY’S CHRISTMAS MIRACLE

I love the holiday season! And what better way for a writer to celebrate than by entering a holiday writing contest! This is children’s author, Susanna Leonard Hill‘s 8th year of sponsoring this fun event, and the rules are as follows:

Theme: Holiday Heroes

Ages: 12 and under

Words: 250 or less

 

And here’s my submission. . .hope you enjoy!

 

MAZY’S CHRISTMAS MIRACLE 

By Patti Richards

 

The stable was damp.

There was leftover hay.

No one would help

On that December day.

 

Snoring sheep snuggled

All warm in their stalls.

Mice dreamed sweet dreams,

In their nests in the walls.

 

But one mouse woke up

When it heard the soft cry

Of a baby just placed

In a manger close by.

 

“That little one’s cold,”

Tiny Mazy could see.

She grabbed knitting needles

And called out to Bea,

 

Her very best friend

Of all the barn beasts.

“We need to act fast,

Give me some of your fleece!”

 

Mazy carded and spun

As quick as she could.

Her fingers were flying,

While Bea calmly stood

 

As her wool became yarn.

Then row after row,

Mazy knit swaddling clothes

For the small one below.

 

Now, when Mary gets

Credit for wrapping her babe,

Mice and sheep the world ‘round

Know it’s what Mazy made.

 

 


Sensibility- Use the holiday season to spark new ideas for writing projects in the coming year.

Sense- Pace yourself and your writing based on the demands of the holiday season. Don’t fret if you’re not as productive as usual. Embrace this time and be present in each moment with family and friends.


 

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Happy Thanksgiving from Sensibility and Sense!

I just wanted to take a moment and thank you all for being part of my publishing journey this year. It’s had its ups and downs, but I love what I do and am glad I get to keep on doing it! I hope your Thanksgiving is full of every good thing. Life is a gift, and I’m glad for this season where we can pause for a while with family and friends and be grateful! Have a lovely Thanksgiving week:)

 

Photo courtesy of Teresa Kogut/Pinterest